Give Crooked Cucumber to a friend


Shunryu Suzuki Main Page     Bibliography    DC home base  DC Books
Core Books by and about Shunryu Suzuki

Crooked Cucumber Home Page


Bibliography in cuke.com
Books by and about Shunryu Suzuki
Shunryu Suzuki basic info
Books by David Chadwick
Amazon.com link

Crooked Cucumber is the biography of Shogaku Shunryu Suzuki Roshi, Soto Zen master, author of Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind, founded San Francisco Zen Center & Buddhist monastery Tassajara, Zen Mountain Center.

Shunryu Suzuki (not to be confused with the great monk and scholar D.T. Suzuki) came to America in 1959 to minister to a small Japanese-American congregation at Sokoji, Soto Zen Mission, on Bush Street in San Francisco.


Photos from Crooked Cucumber


"Chadwick's biography provides a generous glimpse of the humanity and message of one of the great spiritual teachers of the modern world."   
-Publisher's Weekly




Artists, school teachers, poets, and students of Asian culture and thought began to practice zazen, Zen meditation, with Shunryu Suzuki early in the morning.  Crooked Cucumber tells the story of his life and the development of his teaching and the San Francisco Zen center. It includes many previously unpublished excerpts from his lectures, lots of great teaching stories, and a unique, unromantic look at a Zen master's whole life.


Thanks to Gregory Wonderwheel for scanning the back cover of the book back in 2000 and sending it in to replace the poorly done one that was here before. I was embarrassed to tell you I lost your scan. Just got around to replacing it. - DC, 6-19-13


check home for more links   what's new   table of contents    Shunryu Suzuki  donatetothisSite DchadMisc  interviews  bibliography     articles/excerpts      CukeSanghaNews   Death & Dying  SFZC     Current Events  Thank You and OK!  links    comments    Photos and lots more if you look around 


Dharma groups in or related to Shunryu Suzuki's lineage (online or off)

Broadway Books


Issho Fujita suggested Crooked Cucumber to the publisher he works with but was told it's too long. A number of people have tried and failed to get it published. Fujita pointed out that Hoitsu Suzuki said it had been translated. I said yes, by an old student of Suzuki's who'd been asked by the family not to publish it after everyone who looked at the translation including Kaz Tanahashi and translator Shin Yoshifuku said it was not anywhere near publishable quality. It was useful for the family though who were grateful to be able to read it in that translation.